CreativeReview

Knyttan

(Knyttan’s factory opened late last year at Somerset House, where the company is based. The retail space has now closed but the company will be opening a new shop in central London in October, and launching a new collection of products)

Traditionally, these machines are operated by an expert, making it expensive and time consuming to programme a new design. But Knyttan has created custom software which automates the process: once shoppers have finished editing a pattern, they simply click ‘send to knit’ and the machine will get to work, making a jumper in as little as two hours.Buying clothing online is rarely a creative process: select your size, add to basket, pay and wait for delivery. Buy a jumper or scarf from clothing company Knyttan, however, and you can select a pattern, play around with it as much as you like and create a bespoke design that is knitted on demand and delivered the next day. Patterns include a houndstooth design by Amsterdam studio Moniker, a moiré-style one by digital artist Nicolas Sassoon and geometric creations by graphic designer Kate Moross – and the number of variations is endless. Knyttan was founded by Ben Alun-Jones, Hal Watts and Kirsty Emery, who met while studying at the Royal College of Art (Alun-Jones and Watts studied innovation design engineering and Emery, womenswear/knitwear). The idea for it came about after Watts and Emery worked with UK Sport to develop performance clothing for Olympic athletes, and came across industrial knitting machines that could be programmed to produce unique garments.

“We wanted to unlock the potential of these machines to create something different every time, so we developed a system that took away the role of the expert programmer, which is the major bottleneck for the industry,” says Alun-Jones. “We have developed a huge amount of increasingly complex software, and have physicists and computer scientists working behind the scenes to make it incredibly simple and easy for the customer,” he adds.

 Pied De Poule fermier scarf, designed by Amsterdam interaction and media design studio Moniker for Knyttan. Customers can alter the houndstooth print to create a unique version, then produced using an industrial knitting machine at the London factory.
Pied De Poule fermier scarf, designed by Amsterdam interaction and media design studio Moniker for Knyttan. Customers can alter the houndstooth print to create a unique version, then produced using an industrial knitting machine at the London factory.

While Knyttan was set up to give consumers more choice, Alun-Jones is keen to stress that it isn’t looking to replace designers. Instead, it offers a curated selection of patterns that customers can adapt, without straying too far from the designer’s original aesthetic. “A lot of people might have an idea about how a design can be tweaked, but they don’t want to create one from scratch. In this way, we’re not threatening the role of the designer, just challenging them to design in a new way. We have a baseline when it comes to quality, and while everything we produce will be a little bit different, there will always be some parameters,” he says.

Fashion has been slow to adopt mass customisation so far, largely because of the logistical and technical challenges it presents. “You’re dealing with several huge headaches, from where you put stock when everything’s custom, to how the customisation process makes sense for customers, to enabling designers who can’t (or don’t) want to program to embrace a new way of working,” explains Alun-Jones.

 Knyttan's website enables customers to choose from a series of graphic designs, which they can then manipulate on screen before sending them to be knitted automatically
Knyttan’s website enables customers to choose from a series of graphic designs, which they can then manipulate on screen before sending them to be knitted automatically

With Knyttan’s business model, however, products can be made quickly, locally, and without spending a fortune on stock. The company recently received more than £2 million in funding, and plans to open a central London shop in October. It also intends to expand beyond the capital, by working with traditional factories to create “local production hubs”.

“We had conversations with a lot of big brands a long time ago who told us no-one wanted this, from a consumer’s perspective, but we’ve done all sorts of research which suggests the opposite is true, and that there is real demand for this,” says Alun-Jones. “Now we’ve built the underlying tech, we really want to push the creative direction of what we’ve developed to make things people want, are involved in as much as they want and that are of a really high quality. I think there’s a real need for that in fashion: ultimately, it’s all about individuality and expressing your style and personality.”

knyttan.com

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